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Alternative Training (Part 2 of a 3-Part Series)

In the last issue, I gave you a medicine ball workout designed to challenge the musculoskeletal system in multiple shots in about 60 minutes. This new workout can be done on a stationary bike or, weather permitting, outdoors on a real bike. Either way, it should be 60 minutes long and is a combination of cycling and upper body work.

First you need to determine your heart rate zones. Your maximum heart rate (MHR) can be found by taking 220 – age = MHR. If you are 30 years old, your estimated MHR would be 170 beats per minute (BPM). Now you need to find your resting heart rate (RHR). Wear a watch to bed with a second hand you can read in the dark. In the morning, before you sit up out of bed, find your pulse and count your heart rate for a full minute. Take your pulse for ten seconds and multiply by six, or for fifteen seconds and multiply by four. Sixty seconds will be the most accurate. Once you have these numbers, you can now estimate your training zones. area 1 will be your real fat burning zone, area 2 will be a competitive or anaerobic threshold and area 3 will be your peak zone or your “sugar burn” zone.

Your fitness goal will dictate the percentage of your heart rate you enter into the equation. Zone 1 will normally occur at 40% – 65% of your MHR, which we will call the “recovery zone”. Zone 2 or your “aerobic endurance” zone will normally be between 65% and 85%. Above 85% would be your “peak zone”. I’ll cover the zone to train in in a moment.

So here’s the equation we’re going to use. It’s called Karvonen’s theorem, after the man who invented it: 220 – age – RHR x % + RHR = THR (training heart rate). For a 30-something with a resting heart rate of 60 bpm in Zone 1, that might look like this: 220 – 30 – 60 x 60% + 60 = 138 BPM. For zone 2 training, we would increase the percentage. For example, at a training percentage of 80% for the same person, the equation would be 220 – 30 – 60 x 80% + 60 = 188 BPM. Here’s the thing, this equation works for about 80% of the population. If you have an abnormally high or low resting heart rate, or are genetically gifted with a high V0 2 max, this equation will underestimate or overestimate your training zones. The most accurate way to determine heart rate zones is to perform a V0 2 max test using respiratory exchange. Most health clubs do not offer this service. Try a local university’s exercise department or check local sports magazines. Remember this concept, the harder you breathe, the less your body relies on fat for fuel. This doesn’t necessarily mean you won’t burn a lot of fat. This is where it gets tricky.

A study of experienced cyclists by Dr. Jack Wilmore at the University of Texas took a 23-year-old subject who rode a bicycle ergometer for 30 minutes at 50% V0 2 max and on another day 75% of V0 2 max. V02 max. At 50% intensity the cyclist burned a total of 222 calories and at 75% the cyclist burned a total of 332 calories. Keep in mind that at 50% – 60% of a person’s V0 2 max, fat will provide about 50% of the energy, while in contrast fat will only provide about 30% – 33 % of your energy needs when training at 70% – 75% of your V0 2 max. In this particular case, the calculations will show that 50% of 222 calories is 111 fat calories and 33% of 332 calories is 110 fat calories. Basically the same amount of fat calories! For the same 30 minutes of cycling, the so-called fat burning zone burns a greater percentage total calories from fat, but did not burn greater amounts of fat. Although higher intensity training has acquired a smallest percentage of energy from fat, the subject burned the same amount of calories from fat plus an additional 110 calories!

Normally, bodybuilders do their cardio in the morning on an empty stomach. For fat loss, it is normally recommended to do cardio after your strength training. This time, however, you’ll be doing cardio first.

Here’s what you’ll need: a bicycle, padded cycling shorts, a heart rate monitor, tubing or small dumbbells, a tree, pole or something to wrap the tubing in, and a bag to carry the dumbbells and tubing. If you’re indoors, you won’t need a bag.

Position yourself correctly on the bike. Your leg should be almost completely straight in the bottom position with only a slight bend at the knee. The knee should not exceed more than 90 E of flexion at the top of the stroke.

Start pedaling and stay in zone 1 for the first five to ten minutes. After 10 minutes, introduce 60-second intervals in zone two. You will alternate between Zone 1 and 2 for 10 minutes, one minute in Zone 2 and one minute in Zone 1. After the intervals, stay in Zone 1 for five minutes to recover. Once you’ve recovered, jump to area 3 for as long as you can. If you last more than five minutes, you’re a cardio god. Go back to area 1 and calm down. As you get fitter, your Zone 2 intervals will occur at a higher heart rate and you will be able to stay in the higher zones for longer periods of time. Once you’ve cooled down, it’s time to start the upper body.

Stop in a park or get off the stationary bike and do some light stretching. Think of “resetting” your musculature like a cat does when it wakes up. Its very important. You have just been in a flexed sitting position for half an hour. Stretch into extension and perform a few “torso circles” to loosen up.

Superset 1

Horizontal abduction and dumbbell push-ups

Wrap the tube or tubes around a tree, pole, fitness equipment, or something at shoulder height. Hold each end of the tube and raise your upper arms to shoulder level and form a 90 E angle between your arm and forearm like a large “U”. Imagine football goal posts. Rotate your arms inward and point your forearms toward the pole. Holding the tube in each hand, bring your shoulder blades together and row, keeping your arms horizontal to the floor for 15 to 25 reps. Your arms and shoulder blades should move together, squeezing the shoulder blade together as you pull back and releasing them as the arms adduct or move forward. Superset by wrapping the tube around your back and perform shoulder-width pushups on the dumbbells. This will require more stabilization and will keep your wrists closer to the neutral position, making it easier for them. Perform as many push-ups as possible. Alternate between these two exercises for 3 to 4 sets.

Superset 2

Leaning over military rows and presses.

Hold the tube, grab the dumbbells, widen your stance, step onto the tube, and bend your hips about 60 degrees. Take a deep breath, pull your belly button towards your spine, keep your back straight, and let your arms hang down to the floor in a supine grip (palms facing forward). Squeeze your shoulders, row the dumbbells and tubing, bringing your elbows in front of your body. Aim to perform 15 to 25 reps.

With the dumbbells and tubes in your hands and your feet on the tubes, perform military presses as much as you can. If you used multiple strands of tubing, it might be too harsh. Due to the length of the ride in a military press, you may have to let go of some of the tubes. Perform 15 to 25 reps. Alternate between these two exercises for 3 to 4 sets.

Superset 3

Tricep curls and bounces

You will need to use two tubes of the same length and diameter for these exercises.

Spread your feet about two feet apart as if taking a big step forward. Hold both tubes in each hand. Stand with one foot on one tube and the other foot on the other tube. While holding the dumbbells in each hand, slowly curl the dumbbells, alternating one hand at a time. Perform 10 to 15 reps. If you can do more than 15 reps, move on to thicker tubes. It’s much easier to carry than dumbbells.

Staying in the same staggered position, bend over so your back is parallel to the floor. Keep your back straight. Imagine your back is a table and someone has to eat on it. Don’t compromise your spine! With your arm parallel to the floor and the forearm falling just below the elbow perpendicular to the floor, extend your elbow straight out so that it is parallel to your body. Do not twist your arm or forearm. Don’t throw it back or let it come back any further than directly below your elbow. Don’t “rock” it up or down.

Perform 10 to 15 reps.

Superset 4

Cracks and Reverse Cracks

Complete the work by alternating between these two exercises. Perform as many reps as you can.

You should now have a nice pump running. Pack up your things and go home. Take a shower and have a good meal, you deserve it.

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